Preliminary Ethnoichthyological Assessment: Fish Consumption Patterns among Orang Asli Semelai (Aborigines: Proto-Malay) in Tasek Bera, Pahang

  • Nurfatiha Akmal Fawwazah Abdullah-Fauzi Environmental Management and Conservation Research Unit (eNCORe), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Pagoh Campus), 84600, Johor, Malaysia
  • Nursyuhada Othman Environmental Management and Conservation Research Unit (eNCORe), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Pagoh Campus), 84600, Johor, Malaysia
  • Hidayah Haris Environmental Management and Conservation Research Unit (eNCORe), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Pagoh Campus), 84600, Johor, Malaysia
  • Farah Farhana Ramli Environmental Management and Conservation Research Unit (eNCORe), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Pagoh Campus), 84600, Johor, Malaysia
  • Nur Hartini Sariyati Environmental Management and Conservation Research Unit (eNCORe), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Pagoh Campus), 84600, Johor, Malaysia
  • Mohd Faudzir Najmuddin Environmental Management and Conservation Research Unit (eNCORe), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Pagoh Campus), 84600, Johor, Malaysia
  • Mohd Lokman Ilham-Norhakim a)Environmental Management and Conservation Research Unit (eNCORe), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Pagoh Campus), 84600, Johor, Malaysia, b)Kim Ichthyologist Centre, Kampung Parit Samsu, Jalan Temenggong Ahmad, Parit Jawa Muar, Johor, 84150, Malaysia, c)Akim Fishes Enterprise, 81P Pesta 2, Kg Kenangan Tun Dr Ismail, 84000 Muar, Johor, Malaysia
  • Muhammad Abu Bakar Abdul-Latiff Environmental Management and Conservation Research Unit (eNCORe), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Pagoh Campus), 84600, Johor, Malaysia

Abstract

Ethnoichthyology, as a field of study, examines the indigenous knowledge held by ethnic groups concerning different fish species. Despite its significance in understanding traditional fishing practices and cultural connections to aquatic resources, data on fish species consumption among the Orang Asli Semelai community remain limited. Therefore, this ethnoichthyological preliminary study aims to address this research gap by documenting the fish species utilized by the Orang Asli Semelai in the Tasek Bera region of Pahang, Malaysia. To achieve this objective, a comprehensive survey and interview session were conducted with a small sample size of four randomly chosen respondents. The study identified 15 fish species solely consumed as food by the community. The most commonly consumed fish species were the Climbing Perch (Anabas testudineus) and Snakehead Murrel (Channa striata). Additionally, the study revealed the presence of the Critically Endangered Jullien's Golden Carp (Probarbus jullieni) among the consumed species, indicating the urgent need for conservation efforts. The findings underscore the significance of integrating sustainable fishing practices and conservation efforts to protect the unique ecosystem of Tasek Bera and preserve the cultural heritage of the Orang Asli Semelai community. Further comprehensive studies and collaborative approaches are vital to safeguarding the region's aquatic biodiversity and ensuring the community's food security sustainably.

Published
2023-10-31
How to Cite
Abdullah-Fauzi, N. A. F., Othman, N., Haris, H., Ramli, F. F., Sariyati, N. H., Najmuddin, M. F., Ilham-Norhakim, M. L., & Abdul-Latiff, M. A. B. (2023). Preliminary Ethnoichthyological Assessment: Fish Consumption Patterns among Orang Asli Semelai (Aborigines: Proto-Malay) in Tasek Bera, Pahang. Malaysian Journal of Applied Sciences, 8(2), 37-46. https://doi.org/10.37231/myjas.2023.8.2.366
Section
Research Articles